S/V Sea Witch. Polynesian outrigger Inspired Trimaran.

  • 15 Feb 2017 11:02
    Reply # 4610103 on 4608941
    Robert Biegler wrote:
    Martin Smith wrote:

    (start research in cuban refugee boats too...cause we seem to be in the same boat here :P)

    Here is a picture of a catamaran.  Engine-driven again, and I would rather not try to convert it into a sailboat. http://personal.southern.edu/~sbauer/Funstuff/Chevy-Boat/Chevy-Boat.htm
    Hmmm.....well we will take about anything at this stage. About a 200sqm sail should get her going :P
  • 14 Feb 2017 18:30
    Reply # 4608941 on 4608222
    Martin Smith wrote:

    (start research in cuban refugee boats too...cause we seem to be in the same boat here :P)

    Here is a picture of a catamaran.  Engine-driven again, and I would rather not try to convert it into a sailboat. http://personal.southern.edu/~sbauer/Funstuff/Chevy-Boat/Chevy-Boat.htm
  • 14 Feb 2017 11:15
    Reply # 4608222 on 4602302

    Thanks all.

    We aren't stopping the dream....just with the strapped funds we are forced to take it slower.

    And on the trimaran on apolloduck. We have seen her, but even that bargain boat is out of our reach, price wise. 

    We are just two broke people, living in a third world country, dreaming of the impossible.

    (start research in cuban refugee boats too...cause we seem to be in the same boat here :P)

    Last modified: 14 Feb 2017 11:43 | Anonymous member
  • 13 Feb 2017 20:11
    Reply # 4607206 on 4602302
    Keep going and keep dreaming.  I don't know how it happens, but somehow, if you really want to do something, it becomes possible.  You see and seize opportunities, you keep focussed (aka obsessed) and you keep reading about all the other people who also did it, so that you know that it's perfectly realistic.  Sure, you have to go without heaps of things that most people regard as perfectly normal, but it's a really small price to pay for the freedom of living your own life.
  • 13 Feb 2017 19:40
    Reply # 4607175 on 4607150
    Alain Herter wrote:A secondhand Trimaran in South Africa (Montaubin-design, Arafura ?), originally a schooner with freestanding masts and rollerreefing around the rotating masts. Now has apparently been changed to a one masted rig ? (but "not fitted").

     https://www.apolloduck.com/feature.phtml?id=392814


    You couldn't build a seaworthy boat for the current asking price. If she's sound, and the mast is suitable for JR, would-be junkies looking for a trimaran ought to go and get themselves a bargain.
  • 13 Feb 2017 19:28
    Reply # 4607150 on 4602302
    A secondhand Trimaran in South Africa (Montaubin-design, Arafura ?), originally a schooner with freestanding masts and rollerreefing around the rotating masts. Now has apparently been changed to a one masted rig ? (but "not fitted").

     https://www.apolloduck.com/feature.phtml?id=392814




  • 13 Feb 2017 17:09
    Reply # 4606952 on 4602302

    Don't give up on the dream! Dreams are free.

    While your plans are on hold, there's time for a lot of research. Have you read Voyaging on a Small Income, by our very own Annie Hill? Pete and Annie made a N. Atlantic circuit in a Wharram 28ft, Stormalong, as their first step up the passage making learning curve, and I think there's a great deal you might learn from this book, if you haven't already.

  • 13 Feb 2017 13:49
    Reply # 4606518 on 4602302

    Thank you all for your input.

    Sadly this chapter/dream is now on hold. Sandy is now part of the ever growing South-African unemployment stats. The little funds we had spare for the project, now needs to be diverted in to keeping our land-based lives afloat.


  • 13 Feb 2017 13:31
    Reply # 4606497 on 4602302

    Martin,

    You should have a copy of Multihull Voyaging by Thomas Firth Jones.  (I have and have read it at least 3 times).  It is a gold mine of good advice.

    This will probably sway you towards a catamaran, I think his Vireo (based on a 28ft Wharram) would suit you. At this size you get more for your money.  He did build a trimaran, - more complicated and less sea-friendly, though a bit faster.

  • 13 Feb 2017 10:18
    Reply # 4606387 on 4602302

    Martin and Sandy's original post suggests that they do not have the funds at the moment to buy a finished boat.  Thus the temptation to buy some materials and start building bit by bit.  They could save up for a few years and then buy a second hand boat, if they could find something suitable.  They then face the challenge that there are not many suitable boats in South Africa, and they are expensive.  Buying overseas has other challenges, one of which is the crippling exchange rate for South African Currency.  A few years ago I inherited R150,000 from my mother's estate, which translated into $30,000 Australian.  So, although buying a boat and getting some sailing experience might sound logical, I don't think it will work for Martin and Sandy at this stage.  If possible, doing some sailing on other people's boats could be helpful.

    The real issue, Martin and Sandy, is that you build a boat that is well designed and engineered.  Designing it yourself will require a huge amount of research to make up for your lack of hands-on experience.  It is hard to get that information outside of a formal course, like the Westlawn Yacht design program, assuming you do not already have an engineering background.  Crawling over similar types of boats (plywood multihulls) is useful, but getting access to them might prove impossible in SA.  You could buy a set of plans and modify them aesthetically but that can also be fraught with risk, if you compromise the structural integrity or balance.  James Wharram's "ethnic" catamaran designs are another avenue you could explore.  They are the closest thing I can think of in a set of existing plans to your concept.

    Here are a couple of pictures of a Marples Seaclipper tri to inspire you. The plans are still available to purchase.  Click on the images to view a larger version.

    http://www.junkrigassociation.org/resources/MemberAlbums/3295421/Misscellaneous/Seaclipper%2034.jpg



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