13 SibLim - the fitout (3) (47)

Created on: 19 Feb 2017
  • 6 Feb: gluing down the starboard planks. To port, the old masking tape has been removed,taking the worst of the mess with it and new laid down for filling gaps in the seams and topping up screw holes
  • 7 Feb: finishing laying the deck. The masking tape, combined with the accurately thicknessed teak, saves a LOT of sanding.
  • 9 Feb: final top up of the seams. A vacuum cleaner, attached to the sander, makes sanding tolerable.
  • The portholes I bought are impossible (for me) to fit as designed, so I decided to fit them from the inside. To clean them up I discovered some fantastic pads from 3M - no scratches!
  • 14 Feb All done and dusted. Nice, eh?
  • Saligna and teak knock 7 bells out of edge tools. I needed to change the planer blades: 'when all else fails, read the instructions'!
  • 18 Feb FINALLY moving in to the forecabin. Sawing up kaihikatea for cabin sole bearers.
  • The first of the bearers fitted and glued in to place.
  • 19 Feb - the outboard bearers are also cut to fit, but I'll wait until I've finished painting out the bilge area to fit them: they will be hard to paint round.
  • progress report: I suppose the boat won't be looking any different from either end, for a while!
  • 21 Feb - The back of the cabin sole flocoated. I won't paint this, so the epoxy is the final coating.
  • 22 Feb - the cabin sole down and the bunk panel roughtly fitted. Because I - foolishly - only took the kauri panelling part way down, fitting this piece of plywood is a bit of a mission.
  • Fitting the kauri to the bunk panel.
  • 26 Feb: On Badger, all the locker interiors were clear finished, but this made them very dark. Difficult to find things and keep clean. The bottom panel stays clear, which will show up water ingress.
  • 15 Mar - trying out the bunk panel for size, having painted out the locker.
  • 16 Mar - the panel glued in place.
  • 18 Mar A quick final coat on the inside of the panel to tidy up. Painting out the lockers is time consuming, but I think will be worth it when I come to look for things in the future.
  • 19 Mar: it's a big flat area, so will need a fair bit of stout framing to support it. Here I'm fitting a transverse member, supported by an upright.
  • 20 Mar: the rest of the framing. I'm trying to keep it true, in spite of someone commenting that the boat is unlikely to float perfectly level.
  • 21 Mar: originally I was going to fit the flat as one piece and then cut out the hatches. One trip up the ladder with it convinced me that there was an easier, if less elegant, way of doing it.
  • 22 Mar: framing glued in place.
  • Because the panelling didn't go all the way down the bulkheads, I had to add pieces at each end of the bunk front after the event.
  • 24 Mar: the lids were cut out of the bunk and everything was flocoated.
  • The flat was then glued into place. Yes, the lids are enormous: from experience this locker is the only one that will take some items. It's a nightmare if the opening is too small.
  • 1 Apr. The bunk flat finished, apart from a couple of coats of varnish. There is room around the outboard edge for the cushion to be supported when I need to get underneath.
  • 7 Apr. I cut a hatch out of the cabin sole, having cut it in two to fit the tabenacle. I then glue the surrounding area of the sole down.
  • In between work on the tabernacle (see the Tabernacle and Mast album) I carried on finishing up the foredeck: a job I can pick up and put down. Placing the bow rollers.
  • The bronse, cruciform bollard is being fitted on a plinth of teak. Here I've put the glue down ready for the teak.
  • 14 Apr: the feet for the mooring cleat don't lie perfectly flat and the 'bowsprits' may not be perfectly aligned with the deck. To get around this, I placed cleat and rollers on thickened epoxy.
  • 15 Apr. With everything completed, I started varnishing some of the teak deck - purely for the looks of it. I will leave the bow rollers off for the moment so I can get past the bow.
  • 15 Apr progress report because we haven't had one for a while!
  • 27/4 I wanted to build the mast step, but first had to work out the height of the deck at that point and the best way to do that was to fit the deck beams, which I first had to make. So I made a jig.
  • 28/4 I sawed up douglas fir left over from the tabernacle into 5mm strips and used this to laminate up the curved centre of the deck beams.
  • On the first beam, I factored in a 'glue allowance'. Wrong. The glue made no measurable difference to the finished thickness. 6 x 5 = 30mm, finishing at 29. Good enough.
  • 29/4 Friends (now SibLim Club members) Cathy and Pete are rebuilding a house, and they gave me a 'surplus' douglas fir beam. I could hardly move it, but Marcus helped me clean it up.
  • It planed up nicely. It is destined for the straight ends of the deck beams.
  • The beam was too big to put through the table saw, so Marcus used his very old, enormous Makita circular saw. I can hardly lift that up, either. It did a very good, clean job of sawing up the wood.
  • 5/4 With all the beam centres laminated up, the next job was add the straight ends to them.
  • On the first beam, I roughly shaped the overlap, but decided it would be easier to makr it after it was glued in place. This is the short, forward beam.
  • 7/5 One of the deck beams, ready for marking and re-shaping. Note the plywood blocks to keep things aligned.
  • Progress report. It looks vaguely different!
  • 11 May. To shape the glued-up beam, I rought cut it on the bandsaw and then took the plane to it, finishing it with the sander. I regret to say that most of them required a little filling at the end
  • 12 May - when all the deck beams were completed, I put them roughly in place. The bulkheads have yet to be trimmed to shape, but backing up I could eye along their centres.
  • Placed one on top of the other, they beams were disappointingly varied, but in situ, look much better. Distance lends enchantment.
  • When I come to fit the plywood, I can plane and fill as required to get everything fair. The boat looks smaller (and nicer), framed in.
  • The deck beams to support the tabernacle, more or less in position. You will recall that this is where it all started!
  • 14 May. An indifferent photo, but never mind: I've coated one side of each beam with epoxy. They will be in a sandwich so require to be properly sealed.
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

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