12 SibLim - the fitout (2) (50)

Created on: 17 Dec 2016
  • 10 Dec A further frame was required across the forward bulkhead.
  • There was a bit of juggling required, because the longitudinal had to go in before the forward frame. I tend to do these things the wrong way, but the fitting the wood had showed me what was needed.
  • Then the excess glue was cleaned up and the screws given an extra half turn to ensure a close fit.
  • 12 Dec - the next stage was to make a pattern for the floor of the anchor locker.
  • It fitted amazingly well for me, and I reckon can double up as an extra cabin!
  • 17 Dec I coated and glassed the floor, then glued it in and filleted. I was sure I'd taken photos of the glassing, but obviously didn't. Two layers.
  • I've scavenged an old teak boarding platform and am cleaning it up to use as a divider in the anchor locker. Two old pieces in the foreground.
  • 18 Dec I've decided to take progress report photos from the bow, because it doesn't change much from the stern. But I can't get far enough away. Here's the portrait shot.
  • And here's the landscape.
  • 19 Dec The grating will be removable to make cleaning and repainting easier and to enable me to fit access hatches if necessary. First I drew it out full size.
  • I've been given some heated kahikatea, which is a very light wood and am using this for framing.
  • 21 Dec The runners ready for coating with epoxy.
  • 23 Dec In the meantime (AND FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE DON'T TELL DAVID!) I got hold of a heap of quarter sawn teak decking for $640. Teak decks are great non-slip and require hardly any maintenance.
  • 24 Dec Before painting out the anchor locker, drainage holes were made, which are to be coated with many layers of epoxy with graphite powder to protect it from the sun.
  • The assembled grating being fitted: the runners are temporarily held in place with heat gun glue.
  • Once the initial grating was assembled, I fitted end pieces and another piece along the middle. Easier said than done: the old wood was a bit distorted and didn't take to the idea of parallel.
  • 26 Dec Gluing up the grating.
  • The runners glued in.
  • 3 Jan. I'm trying to make the boat low-maintenance, but have been dithering about what paint to use. I was assured that Hempels bilge paint would cover well and be durable, so I decided to use this.
  • 5 Jan. Bad decision - what bit of 'high opacity' do modern paint manufacturers not understand? And I realised that bilge paint might not have UV inhibitors. Correct. So on went a coat of Multicoat.
  • 10 Jan. It still didn't cover, so on went a coast of Brightside. But now I realise how soft oil paints are and wish I'd used two-part polyurethane - and will for all the rest of the exterior paint.
  • 10 Jan Painting the anchor locker at least made me buy two-part polyurethane varnish. It does go on well!
  • 11 Jan Originally, I was going to put the tabernacle in a trough, but have decided it's more trouble than it's worth. The front of the cabin was just butt jointed. So I faired it up and ...
  • The anchor locker (finally) completed. They eyebolt is for the bitter end of the anchor cable.
  • Having filled and sanded the butt joint, I laid two extra layers of fibreglass over the front of the cabin. I think it will be strong enough now. (There's 5 mm of kauri backing up the other side.)
  • 13 Jan The next stage is to make the deck and anchor locker lids. The central 'plank' will be removable to get at the grating, held in place with machine screws.
  • 15 Jan Progress report. Sorry about the teak, David, but it will look so wonderful.
  • The Teak. Nominally 10 mm, I had it split into two. It varies in thickness: nominal was just that. So I'm grading it. 91 kg in total: enough for decks & cockpit & veneering tables, countertops, etc.
  • 18 Jan - In order to complete the anchor locker, I need a bit of additional framing for the lid. Here I'm sawing up some treated kahikatea I've been given by Marcus.
  • 20 Jan - the locker lids and the central panel will land on these saligna stringers. People will jump down onto the foredeck: saligna is good and strong!
  • The deck in place. I need to work out where the teak will be, to work out where the hinge will be, but before I lay the teak I have to cap the forward end of the bulwarks.It all needs a lot of thought
  • 21 Jan The stringers glued in to place.
  • 22 Jan - progress report - but I can't get far enough back to show the cappings I'm fitting!
  • Before proceeding any further with the foredeck, I had to finish capping the bulwark ends.
  • 23 Jan - I laminated treated kahikatea into place and, because of the curve of the hull, screwed it rather than clamping it into place.
  • 24 Jan After making a pattern, I cut the locker lid. I'd debated whether to cut the hinge line parallel to the hull or the centreline. I decided the former would give more support to the deck.
  • 28 Jan The previously flo-coated deck was given 2 coats of epoxy primer and 2 of custom-coloured polyurethane paint. The epoxy is there only because of the poor covering ability of 2-pack poly paint.
  • It cccurred to me that making the scupper might damage my deck, so I did it before gluing down the plywood. The two holes will be joined together to make a long slot.
  • Allowance was made for the teak overlay.
  • 29 Jan Progress report.
  • a little distraction: one of NZ's delightful insects is the praying mantis. They're usually bright green and lurk in the grass, waiting for their prey. This one is camouflaged to match the okoume ply!
  • 30 Jan - the lids for the anchor locker and the removable centre panel land on framework, coated with epoxy and graphite for a hard, UV resistant surface.
  • 31 Jan - now the fun bit starts - fitting the teak to the foredeck - the removable centre panel in this instance.
  • Dry fitting the teak to the forward end of the foredeck. I decided to fill in the space between the bow rollers with teak, too. I've got plenty of it!
  • 1 Feb - the removable centre plank sanded.
  • 3 Feb The stack of prepared teak for the anchor locker lids.
  • Fitting the teak to the rest of the deck. The screws and washers go between the planks: the screws act as spacers, the washers hold the teak down, while the glue sets.
  • 5 Feb: one of the craftsmen in the yard here suggested that investing in masking tape might save me a lot of work. I also sent every piece of teak through the thicknesser at the same setting.
  • A tiny triangle of teak was required to finish the corner. I was delighted that the starboard side could be used as a pattern for the port side.
  • it all looks a bit messy after gluing it down. but the masking tape kept the worst of the epoxy off the cabin front and bulwark.
       " ...there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in junk-rigged boats" 
                                                               - the Chinese Water Rat

                                                              Site contents © the Junk Rig Association and/or individual authors

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software